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Last Updated: Friday, 1 February 2008, 12:09 GMT
Nuclear disarmament experts meet
A reporter amongst the rubble of Hiroshima
A reporter amongst the rubble of Hiroshima
World renowned scholars, diplomats, practitioners and policy-makers are meeting in an attempt to build trust in the area of global nuclear disarmament.

The mix of experts are to gather in Cardiff's Temple of Peace to try to break down suspicion over the issue.

It is hoped concepts of trust building based on nuclear diplomacy at the United Nations can be developed.

Aberystwyth University's David Davies Memorial Institute and Unesco Cymru-Wales are hosting the event.

The memorial institute was set up to honour Lord Davies of Llandinam who played a key role in developing the study of international politics, following his first hand experiences of warfare in the trenches of World War I and who also set up the Temple of Peace.

As an MP and a lord, he advocated radical policies as a solution to disarmament and the threat of war, including the concept of an international police force.

We face the dangerous prospect of a world where the spread of nuclear knowledge to an increasing number of states risks creating 30 or 40 nuclear weapon states by the middle of this century
Prof Nicholas J Wheeler

These objectives were never achieved, but the organisers of the two-day conference, hope bringing experts together and pooling their extensive experience of negotiations on nuclear issues at the United Nations, some important lessons can be learnt about building trust.

Professor Nicholas J Wheeler, director of the David Davies Memorial Institute: "We are delighted to be bringing together a most distinguished gathering of academics and practitioners to explore the possibilities for building trust.

"We face the dangerous prospect of a world where the spread of nuclear knowledge to an increasing number of states risks creating 30 or 40 nuclear weapon states by the middle of this century."

Participants are expected to include senior researchers from the Foreign Office, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Institute of Strategic Studies, as well as the United Nations - including the former British Ambassador to the UN, Sir Emyr Jones Parry.

The project is also sponsored by UNESCO Cymru-Wales which was established by the Welsh Assembly Government in 2005, to provide a link between civil society in Wales and UNESCO's work in contributing to peace, human development and sustainability.



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