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BBC Wales's Mathew Richards
"These are people cited by the witnesses at the inquiry, but then not named"
 real 28k

Martyn Jones MP
"Some of those who were not named have not been investigated thoroughly enough"
 real 28k

Stephen Messham of the abuse survivors' group NORWAS
"We're not vigilantes, it's not a witch-hunt"
 real 28k

BBC Wales's Steve Austins
"He fears a number of people have fallen through the Waterhouse net"
 real 28k

Lembit Opik MP
"We cannot afford to have a kangaroo court about this"
 real 28k

Monday, 21 February, 2000, 13:55 GMT
MP intends to name 50 'abusers'

waterhouse graphic The Waterhouse report uncovered a catalogue of abuse


A Welsh MP is set to name another 50 people he claims are child abusers, following publication of the Waterhouse report into childrens' homes in north Wales.

Clwyd South MP Martyn Jones plans to use parliamentary privilege in the House of Commons to list people he believes are a danger to children and who may well still be working with them.

Mr Jones's actions follow a confidential list of 28 people deemed undesirable to work with children, which was circulated to local councils and charities last week.


There is no advantage in causing a distracting side show which is immensely damaging to one or a number of individuals who are genuinely innocent of any offence
Lembit Opik MP
The 50 people on the MP's own list were cited by witnesses at the north Wales child-abuse inquiry but not then named in the final report.

Under parliamentary rules, Mr Jones could not be sued for defamation by any of those he intends to name.

He plans to first find out through the police, social services and the Home Office whether any of the people named have already been investigated.

"If after that I'm not happy then I will feel moved to read the names out in Parliament," he said.

"I will have to find some debate where I will be in order to name names."

Welsh Liberal Democrat MP Lembit Opik said Mr Jones has to proceed with caution.

"Martyn must be responsible with how he treats the information," Mr Opik told BBC Wales.

"We do not want a witch-hunt, we simply want to protect children.

Martyn Jones MP Martyn Jones: Aims to name names
"There is no advantage in causing a distracting side show which is immensely damaging to one or a number of individuals who are genuinely innocent of any offence.

"You cannot have a kangaroo court about this. We must always be focused on the core objective to protect young people in Wales."

His witch-hunt fears are echoed by Dennis Eady, Chairman of Liberty, Wales.

"We wouldn't be happy about (Martyn Jones' plans) at all. It would be a very irresponsible thing to do because of the danger of creating a witch-hunt and vigilanteism."

But Stephen Messham of Norwas, the abuse survivor's group, believes the fundamental issue is that of protecting children.

"We want these people named as a protection for children. We're not vigilantes and it's not a witch-hunt. There is evidence."

The Waterhouse report recommended a massive overhaul of the care system after uncovering a paedophile ring that targeted hundreds of young people in care in the 1970s and 80s.

Lembit Opik MP Lembit Opik: Words of caution
Last week, councils in Wales were told to check their records by the government to ensure they were not employing any of the 28 named as unsuitable to work with children.

All 22 Welsh authorities confirmed that none of the named people are working for councils and so did not have access to children's homes.

The five health authorities and 16 NHS trusts in Wales also confirmed no-one on the list was working for them.

However, a former careworker from Prestatyn, named in the report, has been discovered working for an English council.

Joan Glover, 53 - a former officer at the South Meadow community home in Prestatyn for 10 years - has been suspended by Stoke-on-Trent City Council.

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See also:
17 Feb 00 |  Wales
Abuse list 28 not in Wales
16 Feb 00 |  Wales
Further abuse prosecutions unlikely
15 Feb 00 |  Wales
Victims tell of abuse ordeal
16 Feb 00 |  Scotland
Childline seeks new abuse check

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