Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK: Wales
Front Page 
World 
UK 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Sport 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Wednesday, 2 February, 2000, 17:48 GMT
'Anti-Welsh racism' protest

National Assembly chamber The AMs think the Welsh should not be the target of racism


Eighteen Assembly Members, representing all four political parties, are calling for an end to what they say is "persistent anti-Welsh racism" in the UK media.

In a written statement, the AMs call on media regulatory bodies to take firm action "against any remarks or images which demean individuals on the basis of their national, cultural or linguistic heritage."

The statement was proposed by AMs Christine Chapman, John Griffiths, and Mike German.

Christine Chapman AM Cynon Valley AM Christine Chapman is one of the proposers of the statement


Those who signed it are: Pauline Jarman, Geraint Davies, Cynog Dafis, Gareth Jones, Dai Lloyd, Jenny Randerson, Karen Sinclair, Brian Hancock, Elin Jones, Lorraine Barrett, Owen John Thomas, Ron Davies, Carwyn Jones, Janice Gregory, Mick Bates.

Two years ago, Sunday Times journalist AA Gill was reported to police for inciting racial hatred after labelling the Welsh "ugly, pugnacious little trolls".

At the time, a dossier of articles by the Sunday Times critic was presented to officers by a collection of angry Welsh people who claimed his "unbridled bigotry" was damaging the nation's image and was pandering to racists.

Ioan Richard, 53, an independent councillor in Swansea, said: "Enough is enough; this man and his newspaper have been abusing this country and its people in the most insulting manner.

'Lame attempt at humour'

"If Mr Gill had been writing about blacks or Asians then he would have been locked up by now.

"We believe what started as a lame attempt at humour has become unbridled bigotry and a wholesale attempt to incite racial hatred," he added.

However, the Crown Prosecution Service decided not to take action against Mr Gill.

CPS lawyers said some of the language might have been insulting but had not meant to stir up racial hatred - which would have been an offence under the Public Order Act.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE

See also:
26 Jan 00 |  UK
Race law to cover public bodies
09 Jan 00 |  UK
English nationalism 'threat to UK'
09 Sep 99 |  Wales
Stereophonics 'flirt' with nationalism - NME

Internet links:

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
Links to other Wales stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Wales stories