Page last updated at 13:22 GMT, Monday, 6 June 2005 14:22 UK

Bilingual book tackles Asperger's

Children
The booklet is intended as a starting point for discussions with children

Helping families deal with children with Asperger's syndrome is the aim of a new book launched on Monday.

The illustrated bilingual booklet, My Brother Gwern - Fy Mrawd Gwern, is aimed at children aged four to seven whose siblings have the condition.

Author Dr Elin Walker Jones said it was a first in the Welsh language and one of only a few in English.

Around 250 delegates were attending a conference on Asperger's Syndrome at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium on Monday.

Autism is a developmental disability affecting social skills, and shares many traits with Asperger's syndrome.

There are thought to be around 18,000 children and adults in Wales with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD).

The most important thing is to love your child, and love them for what they are and work through things
Dr Elin Walker Jones

Dr Walker Jones, a clinical psychologist at Conwy and Denbighshire NHS Trust, said her booklet was written in simple language for children to understand.

"It is written from a sister's perspective and is a talking point - somewhere to start a discussion with your children," she said.

But she said it was difficult to write a book that covered all cases.

"Each child is different, each family is different and each parent might have different priorities," she said.

"The most important thing is to love your child, and love them for what they are and work through things."

Education issues

Jacqui Jackson, who has four children with autism, said that there were many misconceptions.

"It isn't always the case that they are good at maths like in Rainman [a film about autism starring Dustin Hoffman] - it's not like that," she said.

They [children with ASD] are totally unable to be flexible in thought - you have to adapt the environment to suit the child
Jacqui Jackson, mother

"My youngest goes into shops wearing earmuffs because he doesn't like the noise, and hits himself in the face if he doesn't like a smell."

She said that the more resources that were available for parents the better.

"The more information you have, the better-equipped you are at home with the children and to deal with problems in education," she said.

In her opinion, education was a key area as every child was different and had different needs.

"They [children with ASD] are totally unable to be flexible in thought - you have to adapt the environment to suit the child," she added.

Her 16-year-old son Luke Jackson, who has written a book called Freaks, Geeks and the Asperger Syndrome was one of the speakers at Monday's conference.

He said he decided to write the book because he said he did not find a lot of things on the internet very useful.

The day-long conference has been attended by parents of children with Asperger's syndrome and professionals including teachers and other education professionals.



SEE ALSO
Praise for help for autistic son
11 May 05 |  North West Wales
Stars strip for charity calendar
10 Nov 04 |  Wales
Experts challenge autism 'myths'
17 May 04 |  Wales
Autism website 'first of its kind'
04 Dec 02 |  Wales
Autism
03 Mar 05 |  Medical notes
Asperger syndrome
25 Aug 09 |  Health

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific