[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Saturday, 15 November, 2003, 10:59 GMT
Police plans target racist recruits
Pulling was filmed wearing an improvised Ku Klux Klan mask
Pulling was filmed wearing an improvised Ku Klux Klan mask
North Wales Police is planning to change the way it recruits officers, after a BBC documentary uncovered racism within the force.

The proposals, which include having a member of the Black Police Association on every interview panel, will be discussed next week.

Last month, the controversial documentary, called The Secret Policeman, showed one North Wales officer caught on camera wearing a Ku Klux Klan-style mask, and making racist comments during training and at work.

The officer involved - Rob Pulling - resigned in the wake of the documentary, but claimed his extreme views were not out of place in the force.

At the time, North Wales Police called a media conference in which it stressed it had been tackling racism within its ranks.

If you want to send a clear message out that we are inclusive of other cultures, then this is a good way to go
Ray Powell, Black Police Association

Now plans to prevent racist officers slipping through the net look set to be stepped up.

Ray Powell, president of the Black Police Association, said the idea of having local members of the association in the interview procedure was "a very good idea".

"If we really want to be serious about stamping out racism and being inclusive of other cultures, one of the ways is to put somebody from a visible ethnic minority background on every interview panel," he said.

"It integrates them into the decision-making system so that policies and practices are conducive to their culture.

"If you want to send a clear message out that we are inclusive of other cultures, then this is a good way to go."

Richard Brunstrom
Chief Constable Richard Brunstrom wants to cut racism in the force

Mr Powell added that the structure of the interview could also be changed.

"Sometimes the lines of questioning are geared to the white British culture," he said.

"The questions can be geared some way towards being inclusive of other cultures and possibly to identify somebody who isn't totally embrasive of the diversity of our society."

Other changes include using the Black Police Association to play a role in the recruitment of ethnic minorities, and including a statement on the force's attitude to racism in packs for would-be officers.

Chief Constable Richard Brunstrom has said that, if potential recruits cannot accept the standards that the force demands then they should proceed no further with their applications.




SEE ALSO:
My life as a secret policeman
21 Oct 03  |  Magazine


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific