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EDITIONS
Friday, 6 December, 2002, 14:34 GMT
Enthusiasts uncover Bronze Age treasure
Bronze Age treasure
The treasure was uncovered by two enthusiasts
Two enthusiasts with metal detectors have literally struck gold and their 3,000-year-old find has been formally named as treasure at an inquest in north Wales.

Pete Williams and Mike Sheen, both from Wrexham, came across a hoard of bronze and gold dating back to between 1,000 and 800 BC - and are now entitled to a share of its value.

Bronze Age dagger
The dagger is thought to have belonged to a man of substance

At the inquest at the North East Wales Coroner's Court in Flint on Friday, the find of gold bracelet fragments, a bronze axe and dagger was declared as treasure.

According to the law, this means the two men will be "fully compensated for the full monetary value" of the hoard, which will now be independently assessed.

It also enables the National Museum of Wales to have first refusal on acquiring the items.

Adam Gwilt, a curator at the museum in Cardiff, said the discovery was very important to archaeologists.

"It helps us to find out about the society and to piece together an account of the period," he said.

Buried together

The two men from the Wrexham Metal Detectorists Club came across the items at a rally on 16 January near Rossett, in Wrexham.

The late Bronze Age find comprises four gold bracelet fragments, which were placed inside the socket of a slender bronze axe and accompanied by a bronze dagger.

The dagger is the first of its kind to be discovered in Wales, whilst similar gold bracelets are known from two hoards discovered on Anglesey.

Further investigation of the site by the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust suggested that these items had been buried together as a hoard.

It is believed this was disturbed recently by the digging of a drainage ditch.

Finder Pete Williams
Finder Pete Williams wants the treasure back in Wrexham

Outside the hearing Mr Williams said: "I just hope Wrexham can get the find. It was found in Wrexham, and I would like to see it in Wrexham museum."

Wrexham County Borough Museum will now seek to raise enough money to buy the hoard, following assessment by the independent Treasure Valuation Committee.


More from north east Wales
See also:

04 Dec 02 | England
06 Nov 02 | England
03 Nov 02 | England
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