BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Wales  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 19 August, 2002, 14:43 GMT 15:43 UK
Thousands caught in speed campaign
Police and camera graphic generic
North Wales' chief constable has defended a speeding crackdown in his force area which saw a record 7,000 bookings last month.

Richard Brunstrom said he made no apology for the campaign, which has seen a 40% drop in road deaths over five months.


We can show that about a third of fatalities are directly attributable to people driving too fast

North Wales Police Chief Constable Richard Brunstrom

When asked whether police would be better off spending time catching "real criminals", he said speeding motorists were real criminals.

However, the focus on speed has been criticised by the Association of British Drivers who claim dangerous driving without due attention is the real cause of problems on the roads.

Mr Brunstrom said the aim of the force's speeding campaign was to preserve life

"The reason we're into this is because 3,500 people a year are killed on the roads in Great Britain.

"That's something like four times as many that get murdered."

"We can show that about a third of fatalities are directly attributable to people driving too fast."

Arrive Alive van
Arrive Alive is a new campaign

"This is about keeping people alive," added the chief constable.

The increase in the number of bookings follows the launch of the North Wales Police campaign Arrive Alive.

The scheme led to the introduction of more fixed cameras, extra officers and the targeting of accident blackspots.

During July several drivers were caught driving at more than 120mph and one motorcyclist was allegedly caught driving at more than 135mph.

Officers say the camera scheme is working.

Figures released on Monday show North Wales Police are on target to cutting by half the number of children killed or seriously injured by 2004.

Camera
Camera's have caught 7,000 motorists

During 2001, 370 people including 34 children, were killed or seriously injured on the roads in the region.

However, between 1994 and 1998 an average of 513 people including an average 66 children were killed or seriously hurt.

Chief Inspector Richard Hughes, who heads the Arrive Alive campaign, said a five-month survey this year showed that deaths were down by 40%, serious injuries by 23% and the number slightly hurt by 20%.

However, not everyone has welcomed the extra speeding tickets.

Fears have been raised that magistrates will be unable to cope if the number of speeding tickets continue to rise.

If motorists have 12 points on their licences they could face magistrate courts to plead to not be banned.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC Wales' Roger Pinney
According to the chief constable, they are criminals and deserve to be treated as such."

More news from north east Wales
See also:

27 May 02 | Wales
08 Feb 02 | Wales
21 Apr 02 | England
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Wales stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Wales stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes