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Thursday, 18 July, 2002, 13:28 GMT 14:28 UK
Vandals destroy anti-wind farm posters
Wind turbines generic
The wind turbines could be built in the Ceiriog Valley
Posters outlining opposition to plans for giant wind turbines in the Ceiriog Valley have been torn down under the cover of darkness for the second time in less than a month.

More than 40 leaflets proclaiming 'No to wind turbines in the Ceiriog Valley' have been destroyed.


In tearing down the posters and defacing signs on private land they have shown disregard for the opinions of Valley people

Kyron Lawford CVAG

The area is widely regarded as a tourist attraction in north east Wales and local people have raised concerns that a small wind farm will be a blot on the landscape.

Plans for the 300ft trio of turbines at Cefn Coed on the outskirts of Wrexham have been submitted by a local farmer and are being backed by National Wind Power.

The organisation is overseeing the Windworks project, which helps farmers and landowners submit applications for up to three wind turbines.

The scheme has been highlighted as a way for workers to diversify if their farms are no longer making money.

Residents have said the laminated leaflets must have been removed in the early hours of Thursday morning.

Wind turbine
Anti windfarm posters have been removed

Many of them can only be reached with the use of a ladder.

The posters had been paid for by public donation and erected by members of the Ceiriog Valley Action Group(CVAG).

Chairman Kyron Lawford said the attack was mindless: "Just 15 people wrote to Wrexham council supporting the turbine application.

"Therefore we are dealing with perhaps only one or two individuals."

Disregard

It is the second time in two weeks that the posters have been targeted.

Mr Lawford added: "In tearing down the posters and defacing signs on private land they have shown disregard for the opinions of Valley people.

"We put our posters up openly in broad daylight and with conviction for everyone to see."

A spokeswoman for National Wind Power said they knew nothing about the vandalism.

The electricity produced from the turbines will provide power for on average 2,500 houses a year, according to the scheme's promoters.

But some local residents say the wind farm will have a detrimental impact on the rural communities surrounding the area on the outskirts of Wrexham.

The UK Government hopes to have at least 10% of its electricity produced through renewable energy by 2010.

If the development goes ahead in north east Wales it will be the first of its kind in the area.


More news from north east Wales
See also:

23 May 02 | Wales
10 Jul 01 | Wales
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