BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Wales  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 9 July, 2002, 10:16 GMT 11:16 UK
Engineer serves up fish'n'chip fuel
fish and chips fuel graphics
An engineer hopes to revolutionise motoring by switching his diesel car to run on used oil from fish and chip shops.

Chris Dovey, from Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire, has clocked up 9,000 miles in his car, which uses a tank to heat up the old vegetable oil to engine temperatures.

He believes his discovery - which has already been used in America and Japan - could cut motoring costs and run a range of diesel vehicles.

Mr Dovey pays regular visits to local takeaways and the kitchens of Pembrokeshire County Hall, where he works, to stock up on fuel supplies.


Of course you have to filter it several times to take all the chip bits out

Chris Dovey, engineer
He came up with the brainwave during a visit to Australia, where he read an article about a man who had driven round the States on used vegetable oil.

In another example, an Asian food manufacturer in Cheshire, has converted his delivery vehicles to run on cooking oil used for frying popadoms.

Mr Dovey's own cheap fuel is filtered before being poured into the car using a plastic pipe under the wheel arch.

Mr Dovey has been impressed with the reliability of his re-vamped car, which works perfectly.

"It is 100%, it performs just like normal diesel," he said.

"Of course, I have to filter it several times to take all the chip bits out and I then put it into a tank on the van.

'Doesn't miss a beat'

"It is then heated up before it gets to the injectors through a heat exchanger.

"Once the oil is up to temperature, I switch over and I am running on vegetable oil. It does not even miss a beat."

Mr Dovey explained the difference between his fuel and bio-diesel - which has been used for some years - is that he does not put any additives into the vegetable oil.

"Bio-diesel has gone through a process, making it thinner, before it is poured straight into the diesel tank.

'Cheaper motoring'

"But instead of buying chemicals to do the bio-diesel process and being registered with the Environment Agency, I run my car off the waste oil and it is much cheaper.

"I really hope it catches on and creates cheaper motoring for people."

The reaction on the road has caused some amusement, with the occasional motorist fooled into thinking there is a chip shop nearby.

"The only time you smell the fumes is when you are at traffic lights or in a jam. The fumes have a sweet chippy smell, which is quite pleasant, and better than diesel fumes.

"I remember coming through Haverfordwest and we were stopped on a bridge by traffic lights and I looked in my mirror and saw a guy sniffing the air and wondering where the smell was coming from. It was hilarious."


Where I Live, South West Wales
See also:

29 Jul 98 | Asia-Pacific
05 Mar 01 | Scotland
09 May 02 | Science/Nature
02 Oct 00 | UK
Links to more Wales stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Wales stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes