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Tuesday, 10 July, 2001, 10:51 GMT 11:51 UK
Union pays out for 'abuse'
Discrimination graphic
A woman who says she was sexually discriminated against because she was not allowed to work overtime has received a payout - from her own union.

Ceri Evans, 31, from Caerphilly, south Wales, said the union representative subjected her to abuse and harassment when she made complaints about the overtime.


Employers need to ensure that they don't make assumptions about what hours women or men might choose, or be available, to work

EOC chair Julie Mellor

News of the payout comes as figures released show that union membership in Wales has shown a sharp increase in recent years.

There are now more union members in Wales than anywhere else in Wales.

Ms Evans's former employer, print company St Ives (Caerphilly) Ltd had she said would not get overtime because of her part-time status.

It, too, has now paid out as part of the undisclosed settlement.

Ms Evans alleged she was not given a full-time post because of her gender.

Harassment

Opportunities to work overtime were given to full-time workers, who were usually men, she said.

She complained to the Graphical Paper and Media Union (GPMU) father of the chapel - but she said that led to abuse and harassment from the representative and full-time colleagues.

Ms Evans went on sick leave in July last year, after four years working for the company.

The Equal Opportunities Commission says the case - which had been due to go to an employment tribunal - showed how women could be discriminated against even when their basic earnings were the same as male counterparts.

'Same benefits'

Commission chairwoman Julie Mellor said: "Part-time workers are legally entitled to the same benefits as full-time workers, and that includes having equal access to overtime as well as the same pay, pension, holidays, bonuses and sick pay.

"Employers need to ensure that they don't make assumptions about what hours women or men might choose, or be available, to work."

A spokesman for the GPMU said the union could not discuss the case.

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10 Jul 01 | Wales
Workers flock to unions
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