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Saturday, 17 February, 2001, 16:05 GMT
No regrets over English 'insults'
Seimon Glyn addressing the rally in Caernarfon
Seimon Glyn addressing the rally in Caernarfon
A councillor from Gwynedd who has been at the centre of controversy after making allegedly racist remarks about English migration into Wales has told a rally he has no regrets.

Seimon Glyn told Welsh language protestors in Caernarfon on Saturday that he had had hundreds of messages of support from people all over Wales and beyond.

Mr Glyn - the chair of Gwynedd's housing committee - was forced to apologise last month after saying there should be stricter controls on the numbers of English people moving into North Wales.

Addressing a crowd of around 350 people Mr Glyn said that the future looked bleak for Welsh speaking villages on the Llyn Peninsula in north Wales and other areas.

Seimon Glyn
Plaid Cymru councillor Seimon Glyn
Something had to be done soon to try and make it easier for young people to be able to afford homes in the area, said Mr Glyn.

The Welsh Language Society (Cymdeithas Yr Iaith Gymraeg) staged the "Wales is Not For Sale" rally as part of their campaign for a new property act which it claims would make it easier for local people to buy homes.

Members are collecting names on a petition calling on the Welsh Assembly to do something quickly.

The writer Jan Morris has already offered her support to the campaign.

She was among seven signatories to a letter last week which claimed the whole issue was being swept under the carpet.

Llanberis in Gwynedd
People fear being priced out of the market
At Saturday's rally in Caernarfon the veteran language campaigner Dafydd Iwan, who is also a senior Plaid Cymru councillor on Gwynedd council, defended Seimon Glyn.

He said the Labour Party, which has criticised Mr Glyn over his remarks about incomers from England, was trying to score political points before a General Election.

Mr Iwan claimed that Labour had not done anything to help Welsh- speaking rural communites which were under threat.

But Martin Eaglestone, Labour Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Caernarfon, said Labour was working hard to try and get work for people in rural areas.

At the end of the day he said a strong economy was the only way to solve the problems that were facing rural communities.

Inward migration has become an issue in Gwynedd after a report by the council showed that around a third of houses sold in a 12 month period were to people from outside the county.

See also:

11 Jul 00 | Business
Holiday homes boom
16 Dec 99 | Scotland
Double tax for holiday home owners
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