Page last updated at 11:44 GMT, Tuesday, 3 November 2009

Metal detector finds 1m treasure

Metal detector generic
The discovery was made in a field in Stirling using a metal detector

An amateur treasure hunter has unearthed ancient gold jewellery from a field near Stirling using a metal detector.

The rare artefacts, which could be valued at more than £1m, are thought to date from between the 1st and 3rd Century BC.

The treasure hunter, whose identity has not been revealed, found four neckbands or "torcs", made of twisted gold.

A similar one found in Nottinghamshire in 2005 sold for £350,000 at auction.

The Scottish Archaeological Finds Allocation Panel will now value the latest discovery, according to the Daily Record.

A spokesman for the National Museums of Scotland said: "There has been a significant find."

Under Scots law, the Crown can claim any archaeological objects found in Scotland.

Finders have no ownership rights and must report any objects to the Treasure Trove Unit.

However, the man may receive a reward equal to the value of the jewellery.

Anglo Saxon gold

Historian Fiona Watson told BBC Radio Scotland: "It belongs to the Crown and the Crown, at Her Majesty's discretion, can pay money over to the finder to the market value.

"I'm sure that is what will happen.

"The key question then is what will happen to this remarkable find. Where will it go?"

Metal detectorist Terry Herbert unearthed the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found in a Staffordshire field in July.

The haul of about 1,000 items was officially declared to be treasure by a coroner.

Thousands of people queued to see the gold when it went on show in Birmingham.

The treasure is being valued in London.

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