Page last updated at 13:50 GMT, Tuesday, 20 October 2009 14:50 UK

Arbroath Declaration mural saved

Mural
Scotrail director Steve Montgomery and 'Robert the Bruce' unveil the mural

A giant mural recounting the signing of the Declaration of Arbroath, which was due to be thrown away, has been given a new home at Arbroath train station.

The 16ft by 8ft work, painted by artist Charles Anderson in 1984, had hung at Arbroath's Abbeygate Shopping Centre.

However, a make-over at the precinct in the 1990s saw the mural removed and left in an outbuilding where it was destined for the skip.

It was rescued by charity Arbroath Abbey Timethemes.

The Declaration of Arbroath was written on 6 April, 1320, and urged the Pope to recognise Scottish independence.

'Historic abbey'

The mural depicts the barons and earls of Scotland gathered at Arbroath Abbey, in the presence of King Robert Bruce, to send a collective letter to the pope.

The artwork will now hang at Arbroath Station after First ScotRail agreed to display it as part of their Adopt a Station scheme.

Dr Richard Irvine, chairman of Arbroath Abbey Timethemes, said: "We felt it would be an excellent new location for the public display again of this splendid artwork.

"It will be visible to all passengers on the southbound platform.

"They will also be able to glimpse the town's historic abbey and the mural will act as a sign of welcome and friendship."



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