Page last updated at 12:38 GMT, Monday, 22 December 2008

Polish drink-drive warning issued

A section of the Polish warning
The warnings have been sent to Polish language newspapers

A drink-drive warning has been issued in Polish after a number of people from the Eastern European country were caught over the limit by police.

Almost 10% of motorists found to be above the alcohol limit during four weeks of a road safety campaign by Central Scotland Police were Polish.

The warning, issued by Ch Insp Donald McMillan, has been sent to Polish language newspapers.

The legal alcohol limit for driving is stricter in Poland than in the UK.

'Actively patrolling'

Four out of the 43 people detected for drink-driving during the campaign were from Poland, which is over-representative of the Polish population within the area.

Ch Insp McMillan said: "In recent weeks a number of Polish nationals have been caught drinking and driving within the Central Scotland Police area as they are obviously unaware of the limits here.

"As the amount of alcohol in your body depends on various factors such as what you are drinking, your weight and your metabolism, there is no easy way of knowing if you are under the legal limit.

"Central Scotland Police strongly recommend that you should never drink and drive. If you ignore this advice then be aware that officers are actively patrolling the Central Scotland Police area and you will be caught."

He warned that the legal penalties were severe and included an automatic driving ban, a fine of up to 5,000 or a prison sentence.

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