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Last Updated: Tuesday, 19 June 2007, 15:48 GMT 16:48 UK
Minister joins fight to save hill
Gillies Hill, Cambusbarron
Mr Crawford said the landscape would be ruined by the work
A Scottish minister has called on Stirling Council to protect a historic piece of land in danger of being affected by quarry plans.

Gillies Hill, which played a significant part in the Battle of Bannockburn, was earmarked for quarrying in 1982.

Two companies now want to restart quarrying on the site at Cambusbarron, near Stirling, after a 10-year lull.

Local MSP Bruce Crawford said the plans would alter the landscape forever.

He has called on the council to revoke the detailed planning permission which was granted by the then Stirling District Council in 1982.

Stirling Council has the power to stop this disastrous and unwelcome development. I call on them to use it, and put an end to this matter once and for all
Bruce Crawford

Stirling Council has argued that the decision could not be reversed.

However, Mr Crawford, the parliamentary business minister, said that under powers which exist in the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997, permission to reactivate the Murrayshall Quarry at Gillies Hill could be revoked.

"The act makes clear that local authorities reserve the right to modify or revoke any planning permission when it judges that 'material considerations' warrant it," he said.

"I would suggest that the historical importance of the Gillies Hill and the vehement opposition of local people to this development are material considerations.

'Public concern'

"Gillies Hill witnessed perhaps the defining moment of this nation's history. "When Bruce's camp followers emerged from the woods on the Gillies Hill, the English army took fright, mistaking them for Scottish reinforcements."

Mr Crawford said the council must respond to local concerns.

He said: "Stirling Council has the power to stop this disastrous and unwelcome development. I call on them to use it and put an end to this matter once and for all."

A spokesperson for the council said: "The council is aware of the public concern surrounding the proposed reactivation of the Murrayshall Quarry.

"It is proposed that a report on this matter will be presented to a meeting of the full council after the summer recess."


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