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Last Updated: Wednesday, 27 June 2007, 11:48 GMT 12:48 UK
Flashing cones to fight obesity
An obese child (generic)
The interactive game aims to get more children into exercise
An interactive game which aims to fight childhood obesity and improve memory and co-ordination techniques is being piloted at a Stirling primary school.

Engineer Ralf Klinnet, who is based at Stirling University, developed the "Funky Cones" to tempt kids away from the TV and computer.

His idea was funded by the Scottish Executive and has won the support of teachers at St Ninians Primary School.

They say the cones are a learning tool as well as a physical exercise tool.

Teacher Lyndsey McNair told BBC Scotland: "It has helped developmentally for the children - especially the children in the nursery who are learning their colours.

We have also had interest from the healthcare market for people who have had a stroke, for example, and will need retraining in hand to eye coordination
Ralph Klinnet

"They have been using the cones as a learning tool by having to hit the correct colours.

"Children further up the school have to remember colour sequences so it is an additional learning tool as well as being a physical exercise tool."

The cones look like traffic cones from the outside but inside they are full of electronics which make them flash and buzz.

Children have to follow a sequence and then run between the cones to replicate it.

Mr Klinnet's invention has won the support of Scottish Institute of Sport, based in Stirling, and the Scottish Football Association also believe the flashing cones could be used in training for football teams.

He is now looking at other major investors through Stirling University's Sporting Chance initiative which aims to develop the technology behind sport.

Mr Klinnet said: "We actually have a lot of interest from different markets from the sports market to the football market."

"We have also had interest from the healthcare market for people who have had a stroke, for example, and will need retraining in hand to eye coordination."


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