Page last updated at 00:44 GMT, Monday, 15 February 2010

Dumfries and Galloway Council staff given pay increases

Payslip
The pay deal is designed to address historic inequalities

More than 4,000 council staff in south-west Scotland have received pay rises collectively worth almost £9m.

Dumfries and Galloway Council agreed the increases as part of its "single status" deal to address historic wage inequalities for its workers.

About 63% of staff see their salaries rise this month before receiving nearly a year's back-pay next month.

However some workers' wages will not change while others face a reduction in their earnings in three years' time.

DGC staff voted to accept the deal last year and it had been hoped it could be implemented in October.

Wage appeals

However, the authority later accepted that was unrealistic and put a new timetable for implementation in place.

A total of 4,062 employees have received an increase in their February pay packets with £8.75m set aside to meet the annual costs.

The deal was backdated to 1 April 2009 and staff will receive their back-pay next month.

Not all workers will see their wages rise.

About 22% of the council's 6,500 employees will have their salaries unchanged while the remainder will see their pay levels fall in three years' time.

A process has been put in place for any workers wishing to appeal against their new wage level.



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