Page last updated at 10:56 GMT, Friday, 2 October 2009 11:56 UK

Megrahi releases more documents

Adbelbaset Ali al-Megrahi, 9 September, 2009
Megrahi has posted further documents on an internet site

The man convicted of the Lockerbie bombing has released further evidence which he claims could clear his name.

Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi abandoned his appeal against conviction before he was sent home from Greenock Prison on compassionate grounds.

However, he has started to put material on a website which he says shows he should not have been convicted.

In legal terms the move is only of academic interest since Megrahi has already dropped his appeal.

From his home in Tripoli, he is continuing to release material which he says demonstrates he should not have been convicted.

On his website, Megrahi concentrates on the crucial evidence of a Maltese shopkeeper who said he sold the Libyan clothes which were later found wrapped around the bomb which destroyed Pan Am Flight 103.

Much of this was discussed at the original trial, and formed part of the referral back to the appeal court by the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission.

It includes a claim by Megrahi's defence team that details of a witness who saw the transaction - and who says it involved two other Libyan men - were not disclosed by prosecutors.

Megrahi, who has terminal prostate cancer, was freed on compassionate grounds in August.

Before his release, he dropped his second appeal against conviction for killing 270 people in 1988.



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