Page last updated at 09:33 GMT, Monday, 29 June 2009 10:33 UK

Festival targets 'party drug' use

Wickerman Festival
Organisers of the Wickerman have promised to try to stop GBL use

Organisers of a Scottish music festival have pledged to take steps to try to stop the use of the so-called "party drug" GBL among people at the event.

The liquid drug has been the subject of scrutiny following the death of a student in Brighton earlier this year.

Promoters of the Wickerman Festival say they will put measures in place to warn about the dangers of the substance.

The UK Government announced plans to ban GBL last August, but a delay means it is still legal and freely available.

Promoter Sid Ambrose said that in line with other events the Wickerman Festival, held on farmland near Kirkcudbright, was keen to warn about the dangers of GBL.

'Could kill'

However, he admitted an all-out ban would be difficult to enforce.

Mr Ambrose said they had contacted stall holders to ensure nobody would be selling the substance.

He added they would be using their website and other media to try to get across the message of the dangers of taking it.

"This thing is particularly dangerous please don't take it at the Wickerman or, indeed, anywhere else," he said.

"I think the other approach would be to try and do some research and educate people about the particular side effects and why this mixed with alcohol could kill you quite quickly."

Medical student Hester Stewart, 21, died in April after taking the drug.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Call for swift 'party drug' ban
24 Jun 09 |  Sussex
High, above the law
24 Jun 09 |  Magazine
Mum's mission to ban party drug
23 Jun 09 |  Health
Arrest follows student drug death
01 May 09 |  Sussex
Drug ban plea after student dies
29 Apr 09 |  Sussex

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific