Page last updated at 15:25 GMT, Wednesday, 15 April 2009 16:25 UK

Scots nuclear stance criticised

Sizewell B
None of the sites for potential new plants are in Scotland

Two south of Scotland MPs have hit out at the Scottish Government's refusal to approve new nuclear plants being built.

Labour's Russell Brown and Tory David Mundell said it could cost jobs in Dumfries and Galloway where a station was being decommissioned.

The UK Government has released a list of 11 sites in England and Wales where new plants could be built.

But the SNP said Scotland was right to reject "dangerous, unnecessary and costly" power stations.

The UK Government's list of potential sites included three in Cumbria, just south of the border between Scotland and England.

The risks and uncertainties of nuclear power, in terms of waste disposal, decommissioning, security and health concerns, or cost, are far too great
Mike Weir MP
SNP energy spokesman

Mr Brown said the Scottish Government's stance would mean no replacement could be built for the Chapelcross plant in Annan, which is being decommissioned.

He said: "The SNP's anti-nuclear dogma runs the risk of costing jobs in our region.

"Over the last 50 years Dumfriesshire has benefited massively from the highly-skilled local jobs at Chapelcross.

"This list of sites for potential new nuclear power plants underlines that other communities in England and Wales who have benefited equally from the nuclear industry could be boosted by a new generation of skilled jobs."

Mr Mundell said he was also disappointed not to see Chapelcross on the list of potential sites.

"We must ensure security of supply and a balanced energy mix for the future," he said.

"That is why today's announcement is so disappointing and worrying for Scotland."

UK Energy Secretary Ed Miliband also said he hoped the Scottish Government might review its position.

Future demand

He said two new nuclear stations alongside existing ones at Hunterston and Torness could mean up to £5.6bn investment and nearly 9,000 jobs created in building them.

However, the SNP's Westminster energy spokesman, Mike Weir, said Mr Miliband was "wasting his breath".

He said Scotland was "right to reject the development of dangerous, unnecessary and costly new nuclear power stations".

He added: "The risks and uncertainties of nuclear power, in terms of waste disposal, decommissioning, security and health concerns, or cost, are far too great.

"Without nuclear power Scotland has the natural resources to generate clean, green power.

"Harnessing that potential can meet our future energy demands several times over, while tackling climate change."



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