Page last updated at 11:13 GMT, Monday, 6 October 2008 12:13 UK

Quilt tribute to disaster victims

Lockerbie quilt
The falling leaves on the Lockerbie quilt are designed to symbolise some of the victims of the 1988 atrocity

A quilt marking the 20th anniversary of the Lockerbie disaster has been unveiled in the town.

It took five women almost two years to complete the work depicting a tree shedding its leaves in the countryside.

The falling leaves symbolise the 259 people who died on Pan Am Flight 103 while pebbles represent 11 Lockerbie residents who lost their lives.

The tree roots convey the people of Lockerbie who strove to rebuild their lives after the 1988 atrocity.

We are absolutely delighted with the tapestry - it is better than we could ever have hoped
John Gair
Dryfesdale Lodge Visitors Centre Trust

The craftswomen, Elma Graham, Margaret Stockdale, and Ena McKay, all of Dumfries; Barbara Watts, from Dalbeattie, and Kate Henderson, of Clarencefield, are members of the Solway Quilters.

They were invited by the Dryfesdale Lodge Visitors Centre Trust to create the quilt that will hang permanently in the visitor centre at the town's Dryfesdale Cemetery where the 270 disaster victims from 21 countries are commemorated.

Ms Graham said: "The trustees chose the design from several we submitted.

"We shared the work between us and then stitched the pieces together.

"We used cotton, raw wool and silk."

Trust spokesman John Gair said the quilt was perfect for its location.

He said: "We are absolutely delighted with the tapestry - it is better than we could ever have hoped."


SEE ALSO
Health check for Lockerbie bomber
20 Sep 08 |  South of Scotland
'Low key' Lockerbie memorial plan
05 Mar 08 |  South of Scotland

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