Page last updated at 12:17 GMT, Friday, 30 May 2008 13:17 UK

Girls help diabetic coma mother

Sharon Lyall with daughter Holly and niece Nadine
Sharon Lyall was saved by daughter Holly, right, and niece Nadine

Two girls in the Scottish Borders have helped to save the life of a mother who had slipped into a diabetic coma.

Sharon Lyall's five-year-old daughter Holly and niece Nadine, aged four, made a 999 telephone call after she collapsed onto the living room floor.

The children then went outside to alert neighbours on the Burnfoot estate in Hawick to what had happened.

An ambulance took Mrs Lyall to Borders General Hospital where she was kept in overnight before being allowed home.

The 26-year-old mother said that the girls had never been told what to do in the event of her suffering a hypoglycaemic attack.

They saved my life and I can't believe it - I didn't know they even knew anything about dialling 999
Sharon Lyall

However, she believes a recent visit by emergency services to Nadine's nursery school gave them the idea to call 999.

Operators managed to trace the address from the silent call and an ambulance and police were sent to the family house in Hawick.

Mrs Lyall, who has controlled her insulin dependency since she was 12 years old, fell unconscious last weekend with only the two girls in the house.

"I have absolutely no idea what happened and had no warning at all," she said.

"Usually I know I need to drink a Lucozade to stop my blood sugar dropping but this was the worst hypo that has ever happened.

"My mum had spoken to me on the phone but I can't even remember that and I knew nothing until I woke up in hospital more than four hours later."

'Wee bit dead'

It later emerged that the youngsters had also been stroking her arms and trying to give her juice as she lay unconscious.

Holly told people she couldn't wake her mum up while Nadine said that her aunt was "a wee bit dead".

Mrs Lyall said she was still amazed by the girls' actions.

"I kept thinking that if they had thought I was just sleeping and gone upstairs to play, I definitely wouldn't be here now," she said.

"They saved my life and I can't believe it - I didn't know they even knew anything about dialling 999."


SEE ALSO
Award made to life-saving sisters
27 Jun 07 |  South of Scotland

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