Page last updated at 13:14 GMT, Wednesday, 2 September 2009 14:14 UK

Scaffold accident death man named

Malcolm Doughty
Malcolm Doughty died after the scaffolding accident in Aberdeen

A 63-year-old workman who was killed in a scaffolding accident in Aberdeen has been named.

Malcolm Doughty died after the incident at Carmelite Lane, near Aberdeen railway station, on Tuesday morning.

His partner, Margaret Johnson, 81, said: "He was a very good person. Everybody loved him. He will be missed terribly."

Construction union Ucatt said it would contact the Health and Safety Executive about the site.

Ms Johnson said: "He was full of life and always laughing.

"He was very popular with his workmates and really enjoyed working. He didn't even like to take days off sick."

'Assurance needed'

Mr Doughty, originally from Yorkshire, moved to Aberdeen about 30 years ago and worked offshore before moving into the construction industry.

Ms Johnson added: "He loved Aberdeen and the north east and regarded it very much as home."

Mr Doughty was treated at the scene then taken to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, where he was pronounced dead.

Grampian Police and the HSE have launched a joint investigation into the incident, and a report will be submitted to the procurator fiscal.

Harry Frew, regional secretary of Ucatt Scotland, said: "Construction workers need to be assured that sites are safe."



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Man killed in scaffold accident
01 Sep 09 |  North East/N Isles

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2018 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific