Page last updated at 17:00 GMT, Monday, 5 January 2009

Death vessel firm fined 500,000

Bourbon Dolphin

A Norwegian firm has been fined 5m kroner - almost 500,000 - after one of its vessels capsized off the coast of Scotland, with the loss of eight lives.

The Bourbon Dolphin sank off Shetland in April 2007.

Norway's national prosecutor said the new captain had not been given enough time to learn about the crew and ship, as he only had 90 minutes to take over.

Bourbon Offshore Norway can appeal against the order, but has not yet commented on the fine.

The Bourbon Dolphin was pulling a heavy anchor chain which suddenly slid across the side of the deck and started to drag the vessel over.

The two main engines stopped and seconds later the Bourbon Dolphin capsized.

The wreck of the ship sank three days after the incident in the Chevron field, 85 miles west of the Shetland coast.

The captain, Oddne Arve Remoy and his 14-year-old son David Remoy, who was visiting the ship, were among the victims.

Seven of the 15 crew survived.

In reports presented to a Commission of Inquiry set up by the Norwegian government, doubts were raised about the ability of both the vessel and its crew to handle large anchors in such deep water.

Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
HSE examines Shetland tug tragedy
02 Apr 08 |  North East/N Isles
Rig tragedy vessel 'not suitable'
28 Mar 08 |  North East/N Isles
Sinking reports show crew fears
15 Nov 07 |  North East/N Isles
Report into tug tragedy published
24 Oct 07 |  North East/N Isles
Capsize inquiry hears of problems
25 Apr 07 |  North East/N Isles
Tributes paid to captain and son
20 Apr 07 |  North East/N Isles

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific