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Last Updated: Friday, 4 May 2007, 18:52 GMT 19:52 UK
Labour hit by council seat losses
Aberdeen count
The council in Aberdeen is under no overall control
The Scottish Labour Party has suffered a major political blow in Scotland's local government elections.

A total of 26 councils were left with no party obtaining overall control, while only Glasgow and North Lanarkshire remained in Labour hands.

Labour was no longer the majority party in several local authority areas including East Lothian, Midlothian, Clackmannanshire and Stirling Councils.

The Single Transferable Vote system is credited with boosting small parties.

In north-east Scotland, the Liberal Democrats remained the biggest single party in Aberdeen but short of a majority, leaving the council under no overall control.

The Lib Dems have 15 wards to the SNP's 12, Labour's 10, the Tories' five, and one independent.

Arguably the SNP have played these elections best
Professor Richard Kerley
Local government expert

Glasgow remained in Labour control with 45 councillors, 22 SNP, five Greens and Liberal Democrats apiece, with Solidarity and the Conservatives returning one each.

In Aberdeenshire the new council has 24 Liberal Democrats, 22 SNP, 14 Tories and eight independents.

Midlothian is now under no overall control, with nine Labour, six SNP and three Liberal Democrats

On the old council, Labour had 14 of the 18 wards.

Clackmannanshire is also under no overall control with eight Labour, seven SNP, one Liberal Democrat, one Tory and one independent councillor.

On the old council, Labour had 10 of the 18 wards.

In Stirling, Labour has eight wards on the new council to the SNP's seven, the Tories' four, and the Liberal Democrats' three.

Meanwhile, in East Lothian, Labour had just seven councillors to the SNP's seven, the Liberal Democrats' six, the Tories' two, and one independent.

On the old council, Labour had 16 of the 23 wards.




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