Page last updated at 14:36 GMT, Monday, 1 March 2010

Cyclist Jason MacIntyre's widow in tears as DVD played

Jason MacIntyre
Mr MacIntyre was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident

The widow of cyclist Jason MacIntyre broke down in tears as footage of him training was shown at the fatal accident inquiry into his death.

Caroline MacIntyre, 33, also told the first day of the inquiry of the last time she saw her husband alive.

Described as one of Scotland's finest cyclists, he was hit by a van on the A82 near Fort William in January 2008.

Council worker Robert MacTaggart was later fined £500 for careless driving. He said he had not driven since.

Mrs MacIntyre told the inquiry at Fort William Sheriff Court she did not think the possible use of a mobile phone as a factor in the accident was properly looked at.

A DVD was played in court showing her husband training and being interviewed.

I simply can't explain how it happened. I did not see him
Robert MacTaggart

The bike he was riding at the time of the accident was also brought into the court.

Mrs MacIntyre said the last time she saw her husband alive was when she said goodbye to him as he cycled down the hill from their home.

Asked by fiscal Alison Wylie what had happened, Mrs MacIntyre said: "It was 9.55am when I last saw him.

"We were outside and he was holding onto the roof of the car as he was clipping his feet into the pedals.

"I asked how long he was going to be and said it would not be very long, probably about three hours."

She added: "It was a nice day, a bit cold, but it was very clear and dry. He carried a presence on the road, especially as he is tall at 6ft 2in."

Mr MacIntyre was not wearing a helmet.

A pathologist told the court that the cyclist's head injuries were so severe that a helmet would have made little difference.

Highland Council worker Mr MacTaggart, who was fined and banned from driving for six months after the local authority vehicle he was driving was involved in the crash, gave evidence after Mrs MacIntyre.

He said he had not driven since the incident.

World champion

Mr MacTaggart denied he had been distracted by the radio playing in his truck, or using a mobile phone.

He told the court: "I have never reapplied for my licence and don't intend to drive again."

He added: "I simply can't explain how it happened. I did not see him."

In January 2008 more than 400 mourners gathered for his funeral, including former world champion cyclist Graham Obree and representatives from Scottish Cycling, the sport's governing body.

Mr MacIntyre broke Scots' cyclist Graham Obree's 10-mile time trial record in 2007.

He began professional cycling at the age of 18 and went on to win the Tour of the North in Ireland at 23.

He took two years away from racing to help his wife following the premature birth of his daughters, Chloe and Morgan, now 11, before going on to win 13 Scottish titles and three British Championships.

The athlete was selected to represent Scotland in the 2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester and won the British 25-Mile Time Trial twice.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Cyclist's widow welcomes inquiry
05 Feb 10 |  Highlands and Islands
Cyclist's family sue for 500,000
01 Oct 09 |  Highlands and Islands
Family attacks cyclist crash fine
07 Aug 08 |  Highlands and Islands
Cycling star dies after collision
16 Jan 08 |  Highlands and Islands

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific