Page last updated at 13:47 GMT, Sunday, 19 July 2009 14:47 UK

Sunday ferry makes first sailing

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Ferry makes Sunday sailing

The controversial first scheduled Sunday ferry sailing from Stornoway on Lewis to mainland Scotland has gone ahead as planned.

There has been strong opposition on the island, where the Sabbath day has traditionally been strictly observed.

A small group of protesters prayed and sang a psalm as cars boarded the boat, but several hundred people clapped.

Supporters said it would boost the economy of the Hebridean island and offer local people freedom to travel.

A small group of about a dozen protesters gathered in Stornoway ahead of the sailing to Ullapool, which left at 1430 BST.

Equality laws

As cars lined up in the ferry terminal car park, protesters gathered in silence behind a banner.

It read: "Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy".

They sang Psalm 46 - God is our refuge and our strength - and prayed for the nation to "turn its back from sin and wickedness".

A number of women wiped away tears as they prayed for a return to the Lord's commandments.

The crossing was undertaken by the route's usual ferry, the MV Isle of Lewis, after a fault in the exhaust on Friday was repaired sooner than expected.

A spokesman for ferry operator Caledonian MacBrayne said: "We're pleased to get under way after the difficulties over the last couple of days.

"It's all gone as planned."

The MV Isle of Arran was drafted in after the Isle of Lewis broke down.

Protestors in Stornoway
A small group of protesters gathered ahead of the sailing

The former boat ran a number of emergency crossings to clear the backlog of passengers.

CalMac said it could be breaking equality laws if it did not run ferries seven days a week.

It said religion or beliefs were not valid reasons to refuse to run the ferry.

Supporters of the service said it would be good for tourism.

They said it would offer more flexibility to travellers.

As the ferry left Stornoway a crowd of several hundred gathered to applaud, and wave to those on board.

A leaflet handed out by a group of local churches said that the peace and tranquillity of the islands was enjoyed by residents and visitors alike.

It said: "By and large we like it like this.

"We are not oppressed by a quiet Sunday."

It wished tourists who came to Lewis by ferry a "happy and blessed trip to the islands".



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