Page last updated at 14:46 GMT, Wednesday, 15 April 2009 15:46 UK

Man took 'pleasure' from violence

David Robertson
David Robertson has a previous conviction for an axe attack

A man has been jailed and will receive lifelong monitoring for a violent attack on a teenager in 2006.

High Court in Edinburgh heard that David Robertson, 22, was an offender who derived "sexual pleasure from violence".

The Crown deemed the 15-month jail term previously given for the crime to be too lenient and had launched an appeal.

At the time of the attack Robertson was free due to five separate bail orders issued by sheriffs in Inverness.

The Order for Lifelong Restriction (OLR) placed on Robertson requires continued supervision once he is released from prison.

Punched and kicked

His attack on Matthew Olivant in an Inverness park in August 2006 left the victim unconscious with a cut and swollen eyes.

Olivant was with friends in Whin Park when an argument began between them and another group, which included Robertson.

In the attack which followed, Olivant was dragged along the ground and repeatedly punched and kicked by Robertson and others.

Lady Dorrian, imposing the OLR, said she was satisfied Robertson would pose a risk to the public if not detained. He will serve a minimum of 20 months in prison before becoming eligible for release.

Robertson has previously been held at Carstairs high-security psychiatric hospital over suspicions he suffers from serious mental illness.

Defence lawyer Bill Adam said Robertson had been damaged by a troubled upbringing.

He has previous convictions for assault and was jailed in 2007 for an axe attack on a 16-year-old.



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