Page last updated at 00:31 GMT, Monday, 6 October 2008 01:31 UK

Aye of the tiger as pair go north

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Two of the world's rarest tigers are settling into a new home in the Highlands from Edinburgh Zoo where it is hoped they will breed.

Two Amur tigers have been transported from Edinburgh Zoo to a new enclosure at the Highland Wildlife Park, near Kingussie.

The pair named Yuri and Sasha have previously reared six cubs.

Edinburgh Zoo said the wild population was in its healthiest state since before World War II, but remained at serious threat of extinction.

It has previously been proposed moving Edinburgh's polar bear, Mercedes, to the Highland park.

Edinburgh Zoo have replaced the Amurs with a young pair of Sumatran tigers.

The new arrivals - named Tibor and Chandra - are just over a year old and arrived from Heidelberg Zoo in Germany.

Sumatran tigers are also a critically endangered species.

Doug Richardson, animal collection manager at Highland Wildlife Park, said staff were excited to have the Amurs in their care.

He said: "The arrival of the tigers is the latest step in the evolution of the Highland Wildlife Park and one that I am sure will help to raise our profile both within and outside of the Highlands community."

Scott Armstrong, VisitScotland's regional director, said the move would increase visitor numbers at the park.

He added: "Due to the current economic climate, it's a great time to explore what's on our doorsteps and these tigers will mean a unique experience for both locals and those venturing from further a field."


SEE ALSO
Primate recaptured after escape
07 Jul 08 |  Highlands and Islands
Diseases threat to rare wildcats
14 Apr 08 |  Highlands and Islands
Wildcat population to be surveyed
19 Feb 08 |  Highlands and Islands

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