Page last updated at 15:43 GMT, Saturday, 8 August 2009 16:43 UK

Swine flu patient dies in Glasgow

Swine flu virus
The death comes as latest estimates suggest the oubreak is slowing

A 26-year-old man has become the fifth person in Scotland to die after contracting swine flu.

The Scottish Government said the patient, who died in Glasgow's Victoria Infirmary, had significant underlying health problems.

The man contracted the virus on 3 August and was admitted to the hospital three days later.

Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon said the death was "tragic" but did not mean the virus was becoming stronger.

She said: "I extend my sincere condolences to the patient's family at this very sad time.

"While this tragic death shows that in some cases the H1N1 virus can cause complications, I would nevertheless like to stress that this does not mean the virus is getting more dangerous.

"The great majority of people contracting H1N1 are continuing to experience mild symptoms.

"People should therefore continue to take basic hygiene precautions to prevent the spread of infection and, if they do start to show flu-like symptoms, contact NHS 24 or their GP."

The death comes days after officials revealed a drop in the number of people contracting the virus in Scotland.

Estimates suggested about 3,000 people contracted the H1N1 virus last week, which was down from more than 4,000 the previous week.



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