Page last updated at 00:07 GMT, Friday, 7 November 2008

Vaughan's son in Easterhouse bid

Frankie Vaughan (right) in Easterhouse (picture courtesy of Trondra Histopry Group)
Frankie Vaughan helped promote a weapons amnesty in Easterhouse

The son of singer Frankie Vaughan has visited the area of Glasgow where his late father made a famous impact on reducing gang violence.

David Sye was in Easterhouse on Friday to hear about attempts to revive community initiatives.

In the 1960s, Frankie Vaughan was so appalled by gang violence in the area that he organised a weapons amnesty.

He also helped set up the Easterhouse Project - a community centre designed to get young people off the streets.

Mr Sye said he found out about attempts to revive the Easterhouse Project through a newspaper article.

"I thought this was a great idea and called to offer my support," he said.

"Hopefully by bringing attention to the situation there we can get something done."

When Frankie Vaughan came here 40 years ago people were being stabbed and murdered. He made a real difference and there's no doubt that it saved lives
Richard McShane
Blairtummock and Rogerfield Tenants And Residents Association
Mr Sye said he had visited Glasgow several times with his father.

Now a yoga teacher, he has been involved in international projects aimed at conflict resolution.

He said he was delighted to lend a hand in Easterhouse as it was "important that we don't forget about what's happening on our own doorstep".

The campaign to get a new Easterhouse Project up and running is being led by Blairtummock and Rogerfield Tenants And Residents Association.

Its chair, Richard McShane, said the original project had closed down due to a lack of funding.

"When Frankie Vaughan came here 40 years ago people were being stabbed and murdered," he said.

"He made a real difference and there's no doubt that it saved lives.

"We want a new community hall built on the site where the Easterhouse Project used to be.

"There's a lot of youth projects on the go now but no central meeting place for young people and we feel that a new facility could have a similar impact to the one in the 1960s."

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