Page last updated at 10:02 GMT, Thursday, 1 May 2008 11:02 UK

Students hope to strike a chord

David Tennant
'Dr Who' is one of the academy's famous alumni

Students from the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama are taking their campaign against cuts to the Scottish Parliament.

A full symphony orchestra will perform extracts from Bizet and Wagner in a bid to secure extra funding for the academy.

The students claim that 600,000 of cuts could compromise the academy's reputation as well as their classes.

The RSAMD blames long-term underfunding for its current financial position.

A statement from students called the situation "untenable," which could result in "losing its core of a world-class staff across the academy that has taken many decades to build".

It continued: "Without equal funding to England in the longer term, it's feared the RSAMD may have no choice but to close the drama school altogether."

'Historic underfunding'

Labour MSP, Pauline McNeil - whose constituency covers the academy - has lodged a motion in parliament claiming that "historic underfunding has finally come to a head".

The motion called on the Scottish Government to fund the current 600,000 gap and "work with the funding council to ensure that drama and music courses are both funded to conservatoire level to ensure that Scotland remains at the centre of international arts provision."

Famous alumni of the academy include James McAvoy, "Doctor Who" David Tennant and Ruby Wax.


SEE ALSO
Appeal to MSPs over academy cuts
23 Apr 08 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West
Top musician lands academic role
31 Jan 08 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West
Redundancy trawl for arts staff
22 Jan 08 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West
Vision paints pretty arts picture
23 Jun 05 |  Scotland

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