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Last Updated: Monday, 17 September 2007, 14:21 GMT 15:21 UK
Siddique terror trial key figures
THE ACCUSED

Mohammed Atif Siddique
Mohammed Atif Siddique, 21, from Alva in Clackmannanshire, faced three charges relating to terror offences committed at his home and in Glasgow and a charge of breach of the peace.

LEGAL ARGUMENT

Lord Carloway
Judge Lord Carloway directed the trial jury to make its decision dispassionately and without emotion saying that the word terror had very emotive connotations.

Brian McConnachie
Advocate Depute Brian McConnachie QC led the prosecution. He said the trial was about "the terrifying ends people go to in the name of religion" and the accused was a "wannabe suicide bomber".

Donald Findlay QC
Donald Findlay QC, Siddique's defence counsel, warned the jury not to convict the accused through a "fear or alarm" of Islam. He said his client was merely researching terrorism.

WITNESSES

Razia Hussain
Razia Hussain , a former college classmate of Siddique, told the court the accused said he was going to blow up Glasgow, wanted to be a suicide bomber and had met Osama Bin Laden.

Brian Glancey
Brian Glancey, a Glasgow Metropolitan College communications lecturer, said he caught Siddique looking at video clips of "a suicide bomber" and "someone like Osama Bin Laden".

Michael Dickson
Michael Dickson, a forensics analyst with the National Hi-Tech Crime Unit, found "hidden" video footage of Osama Bin Laden urging Jihad against the West on the accused's laptop.

Evan Kohlmann
Evan Kohlmann, an FBI consultant, told the trial how an al-Qaeda recruiting video encouraging Muslims to go to Iraq and become suicide bombers was found on Siddique's computer.

Richard Cawthorne, a police explosives scientist, told the court that Siddique's website had links to military techniques, weapons and how to conceal booby traps.

Det Con Ian Arthur, said that he examined a floppy disc seized during a raid on Siddique's home which contained information about joining an unnamed Muslim organisation.

Alexander Donoghue
Alexander Donoghue, former deputy head teacher at Siddique's school, Alva Academy, said he was a model pupil with an excellent attendance record who was respectful to teachers.

Mohammed Siddique
Mohammed Siddique senior, the father of the accused, explained how he became concerned for his son when he went on an unannounced trip to a religious group.

Fozia Begum, 33, a fellow student, said Siddique claimed Osama Bin Laden was his "god" and showed her footage of a beheading and someone who had blown himself up.

Francesca Demilta, another classmate, said Siddique had told her of his desire to become a suicide bomber. She also overhead him saying he wanted to bomb Glasgow.

Shazia Rehman, 29, Siddique's cousin, received e-mails from him about suicide bombing, the Taleban, Jihad and the massacre of Muslims in Bosnia.




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