Page last updated at 12:36 GMT, Wednesday, 25 February 2009

Green car halves fuel consumption

The hybrid car
The car runs on a mixture of stored energy and petrol

Scientists have used wave power technology to build a car that uses half the fuel of a normal city vehicle.

A BMW saloon was converted with equipment to capture energy normally wasted when a driver brakes.

The team from Midlothian-based Artemis Intelligent Power said the equipment was less expensive than the batteries used in existing hybrid vehicles.

Carbon emissions from the prototype were also down by 30% in combined city and motorway driving.

The system, known as Digital Displacement, was originally developed to convert the irregular movements of waves into a steady stream of energy.

A hydraulic drive allows energy usually wasted during braking to be stored and used again when the car needs to accelerate.

The car ran on a mixture of stored energy and petrol, with computer control technology used to switch between the two power sources.

Project leader Dr Wim Rampen said the technology represented a serious step forward in achieving cost-effective fuel economy.

"The system will be much less expensive than electric hybrids and will help to make hybrid vehicles an economic, rather than a lifestyle, choice," he said.

The project was supported by the Department for Transport and the Energy Saving Trust.



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