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Last Updated: Friday, 28 September 2007, 15:23 GMT 16:23 UK
Pioneering surgery for greyhound
Dr Tony Page with Jet the greyhound
Jet the greyhound recovered after two days
A greyhound in West Lothian has become the first animal in Scotland to be neutered by keyhole surgery.

Jet, a seven-month-old dog, underwent the operation at Ayrton Veterinary Centre in Whitburn.

Dr Tony Page created two tiny holes in Jet's abdomen before removing just the ovaries rather than her womb and her ovaries - known as an ovariectomy.

The Dogs Trust now hope the young dog will be rehomed from their centre in West Calder.

Traditional methods

The charity urges dog owners to neuter their pets to reduce the chance of unwanted litters.

Last year more than 7,000 stray or abandoned dogs were collected in Scotland.

Dogs take up to 10 days to recover from a neutering operation carried out using more traditional methods.

Jet's recovery took less than two days.

Dr Tony Page, of Ayrton Veterinary Centre in Whitburn, who carried out the procedure, said she was chosen because she is a very active dog who would have found it very difficult to stay rested and quiet after conventional surgery, which could have then caused complications.

Jet is full of life and was running around normally the following day and because of the keyhole surgery she didn't need any stitches and is full of beans
Susan Tonner
Dogs Trust

He said: "With advances in human surgery resulting in a lot of these types of operations on humans I really feel that veterinary surgery is also heading in this direction and we will see more and more of these kinds of procedures in the next decade.

"Jet was a great patient and I hope that Dogs Trust can find her a new home soon."

Susan Tonner, Dogs Trust West Calder Rehoming Centre manager, said: "Jet is full of life and was running around normally the following day and because of the keyhole surgery she didn't need any stitches and is full of beans.

"The technique used reduces the chances of infection and since coming back to us she has showed no signs of discomfort.

"She has been a fabulous four-legged friend whilst at the rehoming centre here in West Calder and we hope that we can find her new owners now that she has been neutered and is ready for her new home."


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