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Saturday, 14 October, 2000, 09:21 GMT 10:21 UK
Troublesome gulls inquiry call
Seagull
City residents are complaining about the gulls
A councillor in Edinburgh has called for an in-depth assessment of the problems caused by seagulls.

Sue Tritton has recommended that an official report be commissioned and ideas put forward for controlling the birds before next year's breeding season.

She has suggested that the measures might include removing nests, destroying eggs and using hawks to deter seagulls.

The problem has grown so big that residents in one part of the city have hired a bird of prey to help clear the area.

But that has only resulted in the gulls moving to a neighbouring district.

Rubbish scattered

The council has received complaints from householders who said the have been disturbing them with their constant screeching.

It has also been reported that binbags have been raided and rubbish scattered across the street.

The gulls have been nesting on tenement roofs in South Edinburgh for more than a decade.

But there remains little consensus about how to remove them.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has warned that the residents' options are limited, because culling or removing nests is illegal.

Use of the hawk to scare the gulls is legal but the RSPB admitted it is unlikely to be successful.

Hawks have been used successful in small towns like Dumfries, but are thought not to be suitable in a big city.

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20 Sep 00 | Scotland
Suburban seagulls lower the tone
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