Page last updated at 12:28 GMT, Wednesday, 15 April 2009 13:28 UK

Glasgow has worst UK unemployment

Shoppers on Prince's Street, Edinburgh
Scots consume more sweets and fizzy drinks than the rest of the UK

Glasgow is home to the most workless households in the UK, according to the Office for National Statistics, (ONS).

Figures measured in 2007 indicate 29% of households in the Glasgow City council area had members of working age who were unemployed.

However, Scotland as a whole had the highest employment rate of any UK nation, at 76%.

The ONS offers a snapshot of the state of the nation in its annual Social Trends survey.

It showed Scotland's population has been growing slightly since 2003, reaching 5.1 million in 2007. This accounted for 8% of the total UK population.

Almost 30,000 marriages were celebrated in Scotland in 2007, a decrease of 3% since 2005.

Homicide rates in Scotland were higher than the rest of the UK, at 22 per million as opposed to 14 per million in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Scotland's health

The figures also reflect Scotland's continued poor health.

Life expectancy is the lowest in the UK, standing at 74.6 years for men and 79.6 years for women.

The rate of alcohol-related death is also the UK's highest.

Scotland was the only UK nation to show an increase in breast cancer screening rates, which rose from 69% of the target population in 1995/96 to 76% in 2006/07.

But cervical cancer screening numbers fell by 10% in the same period, to 77% in 2006/07.

The ONS survey also suggests Scots have a love of sweet treats, consuming more confectionary and soft drinks per person per week than the rest of the UK.



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