Page last updated at 00:36 GMT, Tuesday, 10 February 2009

Battle on to save red squirrels

Advertisement

Squirrel cam: Baby red squirrels caught on film (footage speeded-up)

More than 1m is to be spent over the next three years on saving Scotland's red squirrels and protecting routes into their northern strongholds.

The number or reds has been in decline since the arrival of the grey squirrel from North America in the 19th Century.

Greys compete with reds for food and can also carry the squirrel pox virus, which can kill reds in about 14 days.

There are currently about 121,000 red squirrels in Scotland and the country is home to 75% of the UK's reds.

There are thought to be between 200,000 and 300,000 greys in Scotland.

The 1.3m Saving Scotland's Red Squirrels (SSRS) project has been launched in Dunkeld, Perthshire.

It will develop habitats in which the red squirrel can flourish but will also try to control the greys, which will involve killing them.

The Scottish Wildlife Trust (SWT), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission Scotland (FCS), and the Scottish Rural Property and Business Association (SRPBA) are involved in the project.

Mike Russell, speaking while he was still environment minister, said: "The red squirrel is one of our most beautiful and valuable native species. Therefore its loss would be absolutely unforgiveable.

"Saving Scotland's Red Squirrels is a true partnership organisation and I am hopeful that its activity will see the red squirrels able to thrive once again in this country and ensure that future generations are able to enjoy them."

Ron McDonald, from SNH, said that grey squirrel control would be focussed on the key routes being used by grey squirrels to spread north.

"Greys have already displaced red squirrels from most of England, Wales and Scotland's central belt, but much of the north still remains grey-free," he said.

"With sightings of greys becoming more frequent in northern Perthshire and Angus, and a population of grey squirrels already established in Aberdeen, it is imperative that we act quickly to protect red squirrels north of the central belt and prevent the grey's further migration."

Stuart Brooks, from SWT, added: "I can understand and empathise with those people who do not like the prospect of killing wild animals, but it is disingenuous to say that there are viable alternative solutions to saving the red squirrel in Scotland.

"Work is under way on a vaccine for squirrel pox but it is not around the corner and habitat improvements are a key component of our longer-term strategy.

"To do nothing now will certainly consign our native squirrel to a painful and lingering death."

The SSRS project is expected to start work properly in April.

Squirrel numbers

Back to top



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Highland boost to red squirrels
17 Jan 09 |  Highlands and Islands
Alert over red squirrel numbers
19 Dec 08 |  North East/N Isles
Ray of hope for the red squirrel
15 Oct 08 |  Science & Environment
City fights to save red squirrels
15 Oct 08 |  Tayside and Central
Beer money to save red squirrels
06 Oct 08 |  Highlands and Islands

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific