Page last updated at 14:15 GMT, Wednesday, 10 December 2008

Fewer school leavers getting jobs

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Fewer school leavers are going straight into employment

The number of school leavers who have gone straight into work has fallen, according to the Scottish Government.

Latest statistics show that about 25% got jobs immediately in 2007-08, about three percentage points less than in the previous year.

The proportion unemployed and seeking work or training has remained stable for the last three years at about 11%.

However, the number entering further or higher education rose from just under 53% in 2006-07 to just under 56%.

The figures also showed that the number of young people in Scotland who were unemployed and not seeking employment or training - usually because of a gap year or teenage pregnancy - had increased slightly from 1.2% to 1.5%.

The proportion entering training has remained at about 5% since 2004-05.

According to the report, 77% of pupils who live in deprived areas entered a "positive destination" such as education or employment, compared with 93% in the most affluent areas.

Exam qualifications also had an impact on leavers' work and education prospects, with about 83% of unemployed leavers having no qualifications at Higher or better, compared with 54% of all leavers.

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