Page last updated at 10:37 GMT, Wednesday, 24 September 2008 11:37 UK

Child protection cases increase

Anonymous child
Ministers said they were getting help to children who needed it

The number of child protection cases in Scotland has increased by 4%, with almost 12,400 referrals last year, according to official figures.

There was also a drop in the number of under-16s on the child protection register.

Scottish ministers put the rise down to an increased reporting of cases.

At the end of March, 2,400 youngsters were on the register - down 6% on the previous year, according to the Scottish Government-published figures.

There was a total of 12,382 child protection referrals over 2007-08.

A total of 46% were for boys and half were girls, while unborn babies largely accounted for the remaining 4%.

'Effective support'

Children's minister Adam Ingram said the reduction in the size of the register indicated support to help vulnerable people was being put in place quickly.

He added: "The fact that the number of child protection referrals are increasing means more people are reporting their concerns and allowing help and support to be put in place quickly, effectively and collaboratively."

Youngsters suffering physical neglect made up the largest proportion of children placed on local protection registers, at almost half.

Those suffering emotional abuse and physical injury each accounted for about a fifth of placements, while sexual abuse made up 7%.


SEE ALSO
More children on care registers
25 Sep 07 |  Scotland
Rise in children 'at risk' cases
29 Sep 06 |  Scotland
Child referrals hit record level
29 Nov 07 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West

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