Page last updated at 15:15 GMT, Monday, 30 June 2008 16:15 UK

Number of child road deaths falls

Crash scene
Casualty figures appear to have dropped across most categories

The number of children killed on the roads in Scotland has dropped significantly.

Provisional figures show that nine children died in road accidents in 2007, down by 16 on the previous year.

The official statistics also suggest a 10% drop in total fatalities, from 314 to 282, and a 12% drop in serious injuries, from 2,626 to 2,316.

Overall, there were 16,063 road casualties - 1,200 (7%) fewer than in 2006, and the lowest number since 1950.

The Scottish Government said the figures were well ahead of national targets to cut deaths and casualties by 2010.

Transport Minister Stewart Stevenson said: "These are encouraging statistics and I welcome the fall. However, we cannot and will not be complacent.

"It is clear that we can all do more to get our road safety messages across to people of all ages and all driving abilities.

"Road fatalities may be at their lowest level for more than 50 years, but 282 people dying on our roads in Scotland is still 282 too many."

A new road safety strategy for Scotland will be published later in the year.

Final figures for 2007 will be published in the Road Accidents Scotland report in the autumn.


RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific