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Wednesday, 5 April, 2000, 06:09 GMT 07:09 UK
Cash boosts coastal erosion fight
Wemyss Castle
The clifftop Wemyss Castle will benefit
A multi-million pound scheme to save two Fife villages from rising sea water is to be given the go-ahead.

The plan, which should safeguard East and West Wemyss and Dysart, required cash from the Scottish Executive before it could get under way.

That money was handed over when Finance Minister Jack McConnell visited the Fife coast on Wednesday.


Jack McConnell
Jack McConnell: "Urgently needed"
The 500,000 grant means the historic white washed houses of Dysart will be saved from the sea.

The project will also help safeguard the Johnstone fabric factory and Pictish wall paintings of East Wemyss and the clifftop Wemyss Castle .

The sea has gradually been working its way up the Fife beaches because of climate changes.

But a 5m scheme by Fife Council will hopefully stop the sea in its tracks.

Huge rock armour or boulders will be placed along the pebble and sand beaches to prevent them being eroded.

Mr McConnell said: "The coastal villages of Dysart, West Wemyss and East Wemyss on the south east coast of Fife have been severely affected by coastal erosion in recent years.

"This additional allocation will help the council with urgently needed coast protection measures to protect these vulnerable communities."

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19 Jul 99 | Special Report
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