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Last Updated: Tuesday, 28 August 2007, 17:23 GMT 18:23 UK
Parties discuss Holyrood powers
Holyrood exterior

Opposition parties have met in Holyrood to begin talks on how to bring more powers to the Scottish Parliament.

The talks between Labour, the Conservatives and Lib Dems were held in response to the SNP government's plan to hold a referendum on independence.

The topics discussed included the possibility of allowing Holyrood to raise its own revenue.

The three main opposition parties have pledged to oppose the SNP's white paper outlining plans for a referendum.

'Work together'

In a joint statement, Lib Dem leader Nicol Stephen, Labour MSP Cathy Jamieson and former Scottish Conservative leader David McLetchie said their parties would work together to fight the SNP's independence plan.

"Our three parties share the aim of building a strong and prosperous Scotland as part of a strong and prosperous United Kingdom," they said.

"We reject independence. The real conversation, and the one in which the overwhelming majority of Scots wish to participate, is about how devolution can develop to best serve the people of Scotland.

"Today's exploratory meeting was to start that process. Our initiative will not be confined to MSPs alone, any single parliament, nor to any one part of the United Kingdom.

"The three parties have agreed to continue to work together on this issue, and will now hold discussions with party colleagues across the UK with a view to meeting again when parliament has reconvened."

By talking about developing the parliament, it's clear that the status quo is no longer supported by any party. We are delighted
Alex Salmond's spokesman

It is thought the opposition MSPs may set up a special committee to consider the parliament's future.

However, the parties have played down suggestions they will look at forming a shared programme and use their combined total of 78 MSPs to drive through their policies.

In response to the statement, a spokesperson for First Minister Alex Salmond said the talks proved there was now no party at Holyrood opposed to increasing the Scottish Parliament's powers.

He said: "These talks come in the wake of the Scottish government's national conversation on Scotland's constitutional future, which is driving forward the entire process.

"By talking about developing the parliament, it's clear that the status quo is no longer supported by any party. We are delighted.

"The national conversation train has left the station - it's a matter for the London-based parties which compartment they want to get on."




SEE ALSO
Salmond marks 100 days in office
24 Aug 07 |  Scotland
The SNP's first 100 days in power
11 Aug 07 |  Scotland
Independence paper to be released
26 Jul 07 |  Scotland
SNP sees amicable split to union
09 Apr 07 |  Scotland
SNP reveal independence question
25 Mar 07 |  Scotland

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