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Last Updated: Friday, 30 March 2007, 16:27 GMT 17:27 UK
Scotland appoints roadworks tsar
John Gooday
John Gooday has 30 years experience in road management
Scotland's first roadworks tsar has been appointed.

John Gooday, who will earn more than £60,000 a year, will monitor roadworks and has the power to fine councils and utility firms up to £50,000.

A Scottish Executive spokeswoman emphasised that Mr Gooday's responsibilities would not include making sure potholes were filled in.

She said his role would be to ensure that roadworks were carried out "efficiently and speedily".

Mr Gooday's appointment as the first Scottish Road Works Commissioner was announced by Transport Minister Tavish Scott.

Mr Gooday is currently employed by Transport Scotland as a national network manager and has more than 30 years of experience in road management.

This job will allow me to be able to make a contribution to improving the standard and management of roadworks across Scotland.
John Gooday
Road Works commissioner

The executive said the penalties at his disposal would be for "systematic failure" in cases where companies and councils did not co-ordinate or co-operate.

Mr Scott said: "Local roadworks are an unavoidable inconvenience, but poorly managed projects can cause frustration and unnecessary disruption.

"Disruption that leads to extra traffic congestion.

"A safe, reliable transport network keeps our economy moving.

"This appointment will play a vital role in ensuring there is minimum disruption caused by roadworks across the country."

Mr Gooday said: "This job will be both stimulating and challenging, and will allow me to be able to make a contribution to improving the standard and management of roadworks across Scotland.

"When I take up the post in May, my first priority will be to make contact with the key players in the industry to explore how we can jointly take forward the challenge of introducing the improvements in service the public rightly seek."




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