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Last Updated: Tuesday, 5 December 2006, 16:17 GMT
In quotes: Roadmap for transport
The Scottish Executive has unveiled its National Strategy for Transport, outlining its vision for the next 20 years.

Transport Minister Tavish Scott said choices for the future had to be made today if it was to make transport work.

TAVISH SCOTT, TRANSPORT MINISTER

This strategy will not gather dust.

It is not about starry eyed ministers, it is about securing our future.

This strategy will make sure that over the next 20 years and beyond we strive for a world class transport system that meets the needs of passengers, businesses and the environment.

FERGUS EWING, SNP TRANSPORT SPOKESMAN

This publication is long on rhetoric, but short on action.

Our roads are congested and our rail infrastructure is not up to scratch, but this report fails to deal adequately with any of the challenges facing Scotland's transport system today.

Simple steps such as allowing staff to work from home and use flexi-time would significantly cut congestion both on our road and main rail services.

However, easy measures such as this seem to beyond this current Lib-Lab administration

DAVID DAVIDSON, SCOTTISH CONSERVATIVE TRANSPORT SPOKESMAN

The summary of the National Transport Strategy makes no mention of Scotland's number one transport need: a new Forth crossing.

That alone is reason enough to seriously question this document which at times amounts to little more than a wish list of future aspirations and lacks the real level of detail needed.

The omission lays bare Labour and the Lib Dems' pretence about building a new bridge.

JOHN McGOLDRICK, NATIONAL ALLIANCE AGAINST TOLLS SCOTLAND

Calling tolls "road pricing" or "congestion charges" will not persuade people to accept them.

Last year the people of Edinburgh rejected tolls by a margin of three-to-one even though 40% of households didn't have a car.

One reason that they were rejected was that people didn't want a system where inevitably vast amounts would be wasted on collection and enforcement.

They also realised that tolls would encourage some drivers to use longer and less suitable routes.

Road pricing on all Scotland's roads would be 100 times worse.

Drivers are already paying 1bn a week in taxes, they want better roads not more taxes.

LIZ CAMERON, SCOTTISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

The minister has offered us a diet of worthy ambitions for our transport infrastructure, but with little actual detail as to how or when any part of his vision will be delivered.

Let's be clear: if, as the Scottish Executive says, its number one priority is the economy, then let's have that amplified in our transport policy.

On our sea-girt island off the Western edge of Europe, Britain's principal challenge in being a global business player is connectivity.

This is nowhere more true than Scotland.

We need to see commitment, resources and a sense of urgency in building a transport infrastructure fit for purpose for the 21st Century, and I am unsure how or whether this strategy will deliver that.

MARK BALLARD, GREEN TRANSPORT SPOKESMAN

Instead of investing in the M74 and Aberdeen western peripheral bypass, we should invest in the public transport projects that will encourage people to leave their cars at home.

What we cannot accept is a transport strategy that goes in all directions at once, instead of the sustainable and responsible direction needed to reduce congestion and climate change pollution.

COLIN FOX, SSP PARTY LEADER

Free public transport would be the biggest pro-environment and anti-pollution measure ever enacted by any national government.

It would also boost real incomes and be a major anti-poverty and pro-social inclusion measure.

It would also benefit Scottish business particularly the tourism industry

IAIN McMILLAN, CBI SCOTLAND

This strategy is a significant step towards providing the transport system Scotland needs if it is to support business, raise its long-term growth rate, and ensure a more prosperous economy.

Now that the strategy has been published, attention must turn towards delivering the next tranche of transport capacity improvements Scotland needs for the future.

NEIL GREIG, AA MOTORING TRUST

I think we could be quite happy on behalf of Scottish drivers because we are going to see the Central Scotland motorway network completed.

There is going to be new road capacity.

It is how we use that road capacity, integrated with new rail capacity in the future, that is the big issue.

PAUL TETLAW, CHAIRMAN OF TRANSFORM SCOTLAND

The strategy says all the right things. However, it remains to be seen whether the executive will be prepared to take action to deliver the improvements it sets out.

It is imperative that the executive moves forward the implementation of road pricing, and not just talk about it.



SEE ALSO
Transport 'roadmap' for way ahead
05 Dec 06 |  Scotland
National road tolls 'in 10 years'
03 Dec 06 |  UK Politics
Motorists 'must pay for road use'
01 Dec 06 |  UK Politics



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