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Shelley Jofre reports
"Shirley McKie has maintained she was never inside the house"
 real 28k

Wednesday, 19 January, 2000, 00:11 GMT
Fingerprint procedure review call

Fingerprinting Shirley McKie says the fingerprint experts were wrong


There are calls for a review of fingerprinting procedures in Scotland amid claims that police experts wrongly identified a print.

BBC Scotland's Frontline Scotland programme contains claims that experts working for Strathclyde Police wrongly identified a fingerprint at a murder scene in 1997.

Promising young detective Shirley McKie was accused of leaving that print.

Four experts from the Scottish Criminal Records Office in Glasgow said the print belonged to her.

Fingerprint The print was found at a murder scene
She has always maintained she was never inside the house.

She was found not guilty of perjury at the High Court in Glasgow last summer, although the head of the SCRO maintains that their fingerprint identification was sound.

Ms McKie said: "Still people think that I was lucky. That hurts so much because I wasn't lucky.

"I told the truth and got found not guilty and someone else made a mistake and they've got to take responsibility for that but they're not."

Frontline Scotland asked five fingerprint experts in England for an independent analysis of the crime scene mark.

Review call

They all agree the print was not made by Shirley McKie.

A former senior expert from the SCRO takes the same view.

He said: "The mark that I have seen and the print at the scene have not made by the same person."

John Scott of the Scottish Human Rights Centre said: "It's quite possible this was not their first mistake but, unless they can satisfy us that methods have changed, we can have no confidence in them for the future.

"I think there will be a few people looking at evidence that has been produced in the past with perhaps more sceptical eyes than they did at the time it was first presented."

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17 Jan 00 |  Scotland
Frontline Scotland
18 Jan 00 |  Scotland
Finger of suspicion: transcript

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