BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 4 January, 2000, 09:19 GMT
Family still fear millennium bug
Highland cottage
The family moved to the Highlands
A mother who fled to a remote farmhouse in the Scottish Highlands to escape the millennium bug says she is still waiting to see its full effects.

Angela Perron, her husband Jeremy and their children Amber, aged seven, and two-year-old Joseph gave up their modern lifestyle, fearing global chaos if computers running vital services went into meltdown.

Despite reports that the much-hyped Millennium Bug has failed to strike, Mrs Perron said she and her family were still prepared for a worst-case scenario.

She said: "We are waiting to see what the full effects are.


It is looking like a best scenario, but the government's own millennium bug warning is that it is too early to tell.

Angela Perron
"Obviously the initial roll-over period has been encouraging, but the full effects will not be known till about April."

Mr and Mrs Perron left their home in Wiltshire and bought a remote cottage near Forres, Morayshire in 1998.

They planted vegetables and fruit, built a chicken run and filled a storeroom with dried rice, pasta and lentils in preparation for the feared bug.

Story 'raised bug profile'

Mrs Perron, who runs her own publishing business, said she believed the family's high-profile move had helped spur Britain into readiness to beat the bug.

"There was a lot of publicity and I think that helped people realise the seriousness of the situation," she said.

"The government spent a lot of money tackling the bug and it still says we have to wait to see the full effects.

"We went public with our story to help make people aware of the situation.

"It is looking like a best scenario, but the Government's own millennium bug warning is that it is too early to tell."


Talking PointTALKING POINT
Y2K: Was it a con?
Was the millennium bug worth $300bn?
See also:

01 Jan 00 | Business
01 Jan 00 | Scotland
01 Jan 00 | Business
01 Jan 00 | Science/Nature
01 Jan 00 | Science/Nature
31 Dec 99 | Asia-Pacific
01 Jan 00 | Science/Nature
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes