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Last Updated: Tuesday, 14 March 2006, 01:27 GMT
Texts 'uplift' Muslim communities
Nazir Daud
Nazir Daud saw a gap in the market for a Muslim text service
A mobile phone text messaging service which aims to boost the quality of life for Muslims has been launched.

It sends daily uplifting messages to "spiritually enlighten" its users.

The service was the brainchild of Dundee entrepreneur Nazir Daud, who saw an opportunity to make the most of a huge growth in text messaging.

Users are able to receive a host of different services, including messages from the Koran, the Muslim holy book, and daily prayers.

Mr Daud, 41, partly drew on his family's devout Muslim background as inspiration for the service.

Most people don't have time to think religiously every day

Nazir Daud

He added: "I read somewhere that text messaging was growing at a phenomenal rate and was catering for all sorts of subjects, but nobody had ever provided a service like mine before.

"I thought that because the Muslim community made up a large bulk of the population, there was some sort of market for it."

Mr Daud, originally from Malawi in Africa, said modern day hectic lifestyles often left little time for prayer.

"Most people don't have time to think religiously every day," he said.

Family service

"Most people are so caught up in their work that they forget their spiritual side, so this service serves as a reminder that there is more to life than just work.

"I wanted to send messages that enlighten and uplift them and I wanted it to be a service for the whole family."

The service, for which Mr Daud charges from 15 a month, also sends out daily Hadith, the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, and messages for women and children involved in Islam.

It also runs in line with the Islamic calendar, taking into account times of fasting or special holy days.

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