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Last Updated: Tuesday, 19 July, 2005, 17:12 GMT 18:12 UK
Sarwar in talks after city bombs
Mohammed Sarwar called for better communication
Mohammed Sarwar called for better communication
Glasgow MP Mohammed Sarwar has told the prime minister that more must be done to engage young Muslims in mainstream British life.

Mr Sarwar was part of a delegation of senior Muslims who met Tony Blair to discuss the London bombings.

The Labour MP said they were united in the fight against terrorists.

A task force will look at the problem of young Muslims feeling disconnected - a move greeted with scepticism by the Muslim Association of Britain.

Mr Sarwar said the Muslim community in Scotland was in a "state of shock" after the bombings in London.

The message from the meeting was very clear that these terrorists want to divide us and they want us to turn against each other
Mohammed Sarwar MP

"It is beyond belief that young people who were born in this country will become suicidal bombers.

"The tragedy is that the parents of the suicide bombers, their relatives, their friends, did not know what they were up to, what they were going to do.

"I think it is very important that young people have better communication with their own family, with their parents, with community leaders and with government."

He said that young people needed to be encouraged into mainstream politics.

'Divide us'

Mr Sarwar added: "This will give them a voice in parliament and in regional and local government

"The message from the meeting was very clear that these terrorists want to divide us and they want us to turn against each other.

"But we are all united against these terrorists and the people who masterminded these attacks."

Muslim leaders have not been complacent with the problem of terrorism
Osama Saeed
Muslim Association of Britain

He was one of 25 senior Muslims who attended the meeting at Downing Street, which also brought together opposition leaders.

The Muslim Association of Britain said it had not been invited to the summit, and said it believed this was because of its opposition to the Iraq war.

Its Scottish spokesman, Osama Saeed, said: "What happened in London is not the Muslim community's fault, no matter how much the prime minister tries to shift the blame onto us.

"Muslim leaders have not been complacent with the problem of terrorism.

"We have condemned it over and over, and we have not been ignoring people planning attacks if we had ever seen it.

"The security services and even the Leeds families had no idea what was going on, so I fail to see how Muslim leaders can stamp it out."


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