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Last Updated: Friday, 8 July, 2005, 21:45 GMT 22:45 UK
In quotes: reaction to G8 outcome
Scottish politicians, aid workers and campaigners have been giving their reaction to the outcome of the G8 summit at Gleneagles.

MONICA NAGGAGA, OXFAM UGANDA

The communique can only be described as a disappointment.

It agreed to increase aid to the poorest countries so that they get an extra $50bn a year - but not until 2010.

That's five years away. This isn't anywhere near the breakthrough that would be needed if millions are going to break out of poverty.

The G8's aid increase could save the lives of five million children by 2010: but 50 million children's lives will still be lost because the G8 didn't go as far as they should have done.

FIRST MINISTER JACK MCCONNELL

The people of Scotland had made clear they wanted change for Africa.

The decisions for Africa on debt and aid are very significant, and there has been a good start on trade.

I am very proud these decisions have been taken in Scotland.

JOHN LANCHBERY, RSPB

We haven't made any progress but at least we haven't gone backwards which was what we feared.

The US was inevitably the sticking point. President Bush has refused to heed worldwide calls for measures to tackle climate change despite his own scientists and some Republican politicians demanding action too.

Now it is time to look ahead to what the UK can achieve through its EU presidency and to what international negotiators can accomplish at the next climate change talks in Montreal in December.

ALEX SALMOND, SCOTTISH NATIONAL PARTY

This is a long way short of historic. It will not make poverty history and is well short of the paradigm shift that is required.

We need a delivery mechanism so we actually get what is promised and a realisation that what is on offer doesn't meet the scale of the problem.

It is disappointing that concrete proposals on climate change have not been agreed.

There is both a pressing need and a real opportunity for action and the G8 leaders have set their ambitions too low.

SHIONA BAIRD, GREEN PARTY

It is really disappointing that G8 nations have failed to listen to the clamour for more urgent action.

We had little faith in the first place but there was always a ray of hope given the unprecedented demand for change from all over the world.

There may be some crumbs of comfort and some positive language about future meetings, but given the sheer scale of the challenges of climate change and poverty today's statements are hardly adequate.

PAUL CHITNIS, SCOTTISH INTERNATIONAL AID CHARITY SCIAF

We welcome a commitment to increase aid to $50 billion by 2010 but this falls short of demands to do this immediately. Increasing aid to these levels now rather than in five years could save millions of lives.

We are also still calling on rich countries to finally deliver on their 35-year-old promise to give 0.7% of national income to fund international development.

Global trade rules currently condemn millions to modern day economic slavery.

If poor countries are ever to work their own way out of poverty, changes must be made.

TONY JUNIPER, FRIENDS OF THE EARTH INTERNATIONAL

This is a very disappointing finale. The G8 have delivered nothing new here and the text conveys no sense of the scale or urgency of the challenge.

Bush appears to have effectively stalled all progress. The action plan, without any targets or timetables, will deliver very little to reduce emissions, or to roll out renewables to the scale required.

G8 countries currently represent 45% of global emissions of greenhouse gases, but have just 13% of the world¹s population.

The plan of action issued as part of the statement today contains no targets, timetables or committed funding to address the challenge of climate change.

ROBERT FORREST, RENEWABLE ENERGY COMPANY GREENPOWER

The G8 leaders have promised dialogue on climate change but that is not good enough; we want action now.

The G8 has finally acknowledged what environmentalists have being saying for years - that global warming is a serious challenge but, without setting tangible targets for reducing carbon emissions and taking action now, these are empty words.

"Our leaders have failed to recognise that there is a tremendous public desire for governments to take action to stop climate change.

BOB GELDOF

Never before have so many people forced a change of policy onto a global agenda.

If anyone had said eight weeks ago will we get a doubling of aid, will we get a deal on debt, people would have said 'no'.

Ten out of 10 on aid, eight out of 10 on debt.

BONO

Six hundred thousand Africans, mostly children, will remember this G8 submit at Gleneagles because they will be around to remember this summit, and they wouldn't have otherwise.

JOHN LANCHBERY, RSPB

We haven't made any progress but at least we haven't gone backwards which was what we feared.

The US was inevitably the sticking point; President Bush has refused to heed worldwide calls for measures to tackle climate change despite his own scientists and some Republican politicians demanding action too.

Now it is time to look ahead to what the UK can achieve through its EU presidency and to what international negotiators can accomplish at the next climate change talks in Montreal in December.



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